Mac OS X Lion: What you need to know

By Macworld Staff, Macworld |  Software, Apple, Mac OS X

What are all these multitouch gestures, anyway?

There are many, and they’re configurable. (That is, you can turn specific gestures off, and you can often adjust the number of fingers a gesture requires.) You can double-tap on a word with three fingers to look it up in Lion’s built-in dictionary, scroll with two fingers, and zoom in and out by pinching or double-tapping with two fingers. You can swipe between pages (in Safari, iPhoto, and other apps) with left or right two-finger swipes, and you can swipe between apps with three or four fingers. Trigger Mission Control—Lion’s new take on Exposé—with a three-finger swipe up, and reveal the desktop by spreading your thumb and three fingers apart, as if you’re flicking all your windows away.

What’s this about scrolling being backwards in Lion?

If you’ve ever used an iOS device, you may have noticed that your content will scroll in the direction you push or pull it, imitating how you’d interact with a real-world object. In Lion, Apple has brought this concept—often referred to as inverse scrolling—to the desktop: Pull down with your fingers, and the document will move downward—bringing you closer to the top.

If this doesn’t quite translate for you on the desktop as it might on an iPhone or iPad, don’t fret: Lion includes a preference to restore scrolling to the direction you're accustomed to.

What’s changed in the Finder?

The Finder has gotten a minor makeover: its sidebar icons now look a lot like the icons in iTunes—monochromatic and simple. A new All My Files pseudo-folder in the Finder displays all of of the documents on your Mac, grouped by type. By default, Finder windows no longer show their Status bar relaying your available drive space, but you can re-enable it. And as with all windows under Lion, you can resize your Finder windows from anywhere across all four window edges.

Features

How will Lion change my daily Mac-using experience?

It could have a pretty substantial impact, we think. A trio of features—Resume, Autosave, and Versions—may have the single greatest impact on your day-to-day Mac use. With Resume, when you quit an application with a bunch of open windows and later relaunch it, compatible applications should—ta-da!—resume in exactly the state you last left them. If you’re accustomed to iOS, it’s similar to the “freeze” state multitasking approach in iOS 4; Lion brings that to the desktop, and it even works after you reboot your Mac.


Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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