Mac OS X Lion: What you need to know

By Macworld Staff, Macworld |  Software, Apple, Mac OS X

Autosave and Versions combine to help you kick your Command-S habit: Compatible apps can save your files for you as you type, and you can view and restore—as well as cut and copy from—all your past revisions in a Time Machine-esque portal. By default, Versions will save a copy of your file every hour; anytime you manually save, you’ll add a new version “checkpoint” as well. As a result, you can spend more time writing your document—or editing your photo, or building code—and less time worrying about how it’s being saved and stored.

How do fullscreen apps work? How do I know about alerts in my Dock if my app is fullscreen?

Fullscreen applications—like their name suggests—operate by expanding the application to take up the entire width of the screen. They open in a separate desktop space, so that you can still access any other windows by switching spaces via multitouch gesture or Mission Control. Most of Apple’s applications will support fullscreen mode on launch; for third-party programs, however, developers will need to update their code before it can be used.

To send an application into fullscreen mode, click the button in the upper-right corner of the toolbar. You can see your dock in fullscreen mode by moving your mouse to the side of the screen where you have it anchored; you can similarly trigger the menu bar by moving the mouse to the top. If you depend on blinking Dock icons (and not audio queues) for alerts about new e-mail messages or instant messages, however, be warned that you’ll be blind to such notifications when you use an app in fullscreen mode, as the Dock operates as if you’ve hidden it. (Bouncing Dock notifications will still briefly appear when you’re running a fullscreen app.)

What is AirDrop?

First revealed during the October Lion preview, AirDrop got more extensive demo time during WWDC. It’s a file-sharing feature designed to allow users in the same area to transfer files wirelessly. AirDrop finds other users in your vicinity—even if there’s no Wi-Fi network—and allows you to exchange files with them.

Select the AirDrop item in the Finder’s Sources sidebar to see the icons of other AirDrop users on your local network. To share a file, drop it onto the icon of the person you wish to send the file to. The receiving party will see a notification asking them if they’d like to accept or decline the transfer.

Can I use AirDrop to send files to my friends or family out of state?

No. This is short-range technology—it’s only designed to find other users within a 30-foot radius, Apple says. So unless you’re standing at the state line and they’re on the other side waving at you, you won’t be able to use AirDrop to send files to your out-of-state friends and family.

What is Launchpad?


Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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