Spring Framework founder: Java needs cloud accommodations

Rod Johnson says that Java must seize the lead when it comes to cloud computing or risk being overtaken by languages like Ruby

By , InfoWorld |  Cloud Computing, java, spring framework

To maintain its prominence, Java must evolve to meet the needs of cloud computing, the author of the popular Spring Framework for Java said on Tuesday.

Java needs continued productivity increases and must accommodate non-relational data stores like Hadoop to thrive in the cloud, said Spring founder Rod Johnson, senior vice president at VMware, at the Jax Java conference in San Jose, Calif. But these issues are in the process of being addressed, he said.

[ During his presentation, Johnson predicted that PaaS (platform-as-a-service) cloud computing will become prominent for deploying custom applications. | Keep up with the latest developer news with InfoWorld's Developer World newsletter. | Follow Paul Krill on Twitter.]

"A lot of this is coming from the open source community," Johnson said. He cited the Spring Data project for data access as an example of a project that would improve Java for the cloud. "If Java does not really seize the lead in cloud computing in the next year, I think it has a much greater chance of being eclipsed by languages like Ruby."

Johnson, as he has done in recent years, emphasized his cloud-is-inevitable mantra. He stressed that fewer than 30% of IT expenditures go toward developing new functionality; most of the expense is for managing legacy systems. Cloud computing provides a solution to this problem, he explain. "This is the fundamental reason that cloud computing is important." Unlike SOA, cloud computing is not a buzzword driven by vendor hype, said Johnson. "This one, I think, is different. Enterprise middleware, as we know it, will cease to exist."

Current methods in which IT deploys application servers, messaging brokers, and other software will give way to organizations either working with public clouds or their own private PaaS rather than dealing with low-level infrastructure components, which is complex, Johnson said. He also noted that Java is a good fit for PaaS, offering a programming model such as Java EE (Java Platform, Enterprise Edition) or Spring.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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