Winklevii wearing out their welcome

No sooner do wealthy twins drop one Facebook lawsuit, they launch another

By  

Source: Facebook

It's enough to almost make you feel bad for Mark Zuckerberg.

I said "almost."

Just when it appeared Tyler and Cameron Winklevoss had finally given up trying to get a court-ordered "do-over" of their $65 million settlement with Facebook and chief executive Zuck, they turn right around and try again in a different court.

From Reuters:

The twins have now filed a status report in Massachusetts federal court that pushes for further discovery. In particular, the twins are looking at a bunch of instant messages that turned up after they made a settlement valued between $65 million and $160 million.

The basis for the latest action is that the Winklevii assert Facebook "intentionally or inadvertently suppressed evidence" of its real value during initial settlement proceedings in early 2008 over claims that Zuckerberg stole the idea for the social networking site from the twins while all were attending Harvard in 2004.

Ever since Facebook became an international scourge sensation worth more money than Whitey Bulger ever shook down from Boston-area bookies, liquor-store owners and lottery winners, the hard-luck twins have been imploring the courts to overturn their measly multimillion-dollar agreement with Facebook.

This latest move comes just one day after the Winklevoss lads dropped an appeal before the Supreme Court which sought to overturn a lower-court ruling that the wealthy twins should shut up and row away.

Worse, it also comes just one day after the Winklevii received some pretty darned good career advice from yours truly.

I'll never get back the 23 minutes it took to write that post. Nonetheless, I've crunched some numbers and, based on the earnings potential of my ideas, you owe me -- I'm ballparking here -- about $1 million. Each. "Friend" me on Facebook and we'll hash out the details, though PayPal would be fine.

Of course, this being America, the Winklevoss twins are entitled to their day in court. Being wealthy and all, they're also apparently entitled to as many days in court as they want.

But I hope they don't expect any of us to "like" it.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness