Elgan: The rise and rise (and rise) of Apple's iOS

By , Computerworld |  Software, Apple iOS

A recent survey measuring Web traffic by various devices found that some 97% of all tablet traffic in the United States comes from iPads . And if you think that's high, the number is 100% in Japan and 99% in the UK. (The global average is 89%.)

All these market share and traffic numbers mask a stark business reality: Apple makes vastly more money from mobile devices than its competitors.

Firstly, Apple makes money from handsets, which Google no longer sells. Secondly, Apple makes money from apps -- far more per app than any other platform, and far more apps. For example, last year Google earned about $102 million from apps sales, while Apple raked in $1.7 billion .

Apple's iOS is even more profitable than Microsoft Windows -- 2.3 times higher.

App developers point out that iOS is easier to develop for and monetize than the Google Android platform, and presumably other competitors as well.

The success of iOS devices thus far is nothing compared with what's coming. One report says Apple has ordered two manufacturers to build enough iPhone 5 handsets to sell 15 million in the first month of sales . The new phone is expected to launch in August or September.

A study coming from the Yankee Group next month finds that about 40% of all smartphone buyers in Europe say they intend to buy an iPhone next time they buy a phone.

A reasonably credible rumor from a blogger in China says that China's biggest carrier, China Mobile, will soon announce a deal to sell the iPhone 5 .

The current iPhone is available in China only from the No. 2 carrier. Such an announcement would suggest a radical increase in iPhone sales in the world's largest country, and one with an incredible 910 million mobile phone subscribers , where the iPhone is very popular.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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