Top U.S. web properties in June vs. one year ago

Amazon Sites, Viacom, Facebook register big gains, Fox Interactive plummets

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Each month digital measurement and analysis company comScore releases a monthly analysis of U.S. web activity, including the top 50 U.S. properties by unique visitors.

The June numbers were announced on Friday. In some of its breakouts comScore compares numbers from the previous month (in this case May), but I thought it'd be more interesting to look at a year-over-year comparison.

(Also see: Google's share of U.S. search market dips)

Below are the top 10 U.S. properties for June, with total unique visitors, along with total for June 2010 and the percentage change.

Total U.S. Internet audience
June 2011: 214.47 million
June 2010: 215.06 million
Pct. change: -0.3%

Google Sites
June 2011: 182.54 million
June 2010: 178.79 million
Pct. change: 2.1%

Yahoo Sites
June 2011: 178.38 million
June 2010: 170.22 million
Pct. change: 4.8%

Microsoft Sites
June 2011: 173.56 million
June 2010: 160.85 million
Pct. change: 7.9%

Facebook
June 2011: 160.88 million
June 2010: 141.64 million
Pct. change: 13.6%

AOL
June 2011: 110.45 million
June 2010: 107.48 million
Pct. change: 2.8%

Amazon Sites
June 2011: 95.77 million
June 2010: 75.97 million
Pct. change: 26.1%

Turner Digital
June 2011: 93.38 million
June 2010: 85.29 million
Pct. change: 9.5%

Glam Media
June 2011: 85.99 million
June 2010: 85.44 million
Pct. change: 0.6%

Ask Network
June 2011: 84.81 million
June 2010: 87.41 million
Pct. change: -3.0%

Viacom Digital
June 2011: 81.65 million
June 2010: 66.04 million
Pct. change: 23.6%

As you can see, Amazon Sites, Viacom Digital and Facebook posted double-digit year-over-year gains in unique visitors from June to June, even as the total U.S. Internet audience dipped ever so slightly.

The biggest losers aren't on the list above because it's based on the top 10 properties for June 2011. But Fox Interactive Media, which ranked No. 6 in June 2010, saw a 46% drop in unique visitors to 47.99 million from last year's 88.83 million, perhaps because in June 2010 we were headed into a mid-term election and readers were flocking there to get their Tea Party and birther news. Fox sites were ranked No. 20 last month.

And AOL's (NYSE: AOL) modest 2.8% gain should trouble investors because that includes traffic from its acquisition earlier this year of The Huffington Post. Which means that organic traffic actually fell, though it's hard to determine how much.

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