Google+ starts out far faster than Facebook, Twitter

With 25 million users in less than a month, Google+ is quick out of the gate; analysts not surprised at fast start

By , Computerworld |  Cloud Computing, Google, Social Networking

Google+ is going great guns right out of the gate, with the site starting out far better than rivals Facebook, Twitter and Myspace did.

Google+ , the social network Google launched just over a month ago, already has more than 25 million visitors, according to Comscore, an Internet traffic watcher.

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Comscore said Google+ hit the 25 million visitor mark just shy of its one-month birthday.

Meanwhile, Comscore notes that it took Facebook about 35 months to get 25 million visitors. It took Twitter more than 30 months and it took Myspace more than 20 months to reach the 25 million-user mark, Comscore added.

"I'm mainly trying to put Google+'s exceptional growth in context by showing that Facebook is today the clear market leader even though it took longer than all its key competitors to reach 25 million," said Andrew Lipsman, a vice president at Comscore.

Lipsman added that at this point it's unclear how many of those 25 million Google+ users are regular users of the site or are simply people curious to take a look at the new site.

"It's hard to ignore the impressive growth numbers so far, but I think there are also many visitors who are still dipping their toes into the pool but not yet ready to dive in," he said.

He also noted that Google+ is still in a field trial phase and that users can only join the social network by invitation.

Dan Olds, an analyst with The Gabriel Consulting Group, agreed that the Google+ numbers are impressive, but he added that they're not surprising.

"Come on, they've got Google behind it," said Olds. "The visitor count is probably a combination of looky loos and actual users who are getting their profiles in shape."

And he also noted that just because Google+ is out of the gate faster than Facebook and Twitter, there's still a long way to go to usurp them.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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