'NewSQL' could combine the best of SQL and NoSQL

A database pioneer argues the best of SQL and NoSQL could be combined in database systems

By , IDG News Service |  Software

Stonebraker boasted that VoltDB's own system, which uses these NewSQL-styled approaches, can execute transactions 45 times faster than a typical relational database system. VoltDB can scale across 39 servers, and handle up to 1.6 million transactions per second across 300 CPU cores, he said. It also requires far fewer servers than a typical Hadoop implementation, doing the same work in 20 nodes that would require Hadoop 1,000 nodes to execute.

While the audience was comprised of NoSQL users and developers, many seemed to think Stonebraker's SQL-friendlier approach had some merit, even if they disagreed on individual points.

Dwight Merriman, a founder of online advertising company DoubleClick and one of the creators of MongoDB, agreed with Stonebraker that SQL itself doesn't prevent scalability and slow performance. But he argued that SQL may not be the language everyone would want to use to parse and query their data in the years to come. "I would like to use something a little closer to the original language" that his applications are written in, he noted. SQL-based stored procedures are particularly difficult to work with for many programmers, he said.

Stonebraker is confronting the correct problem, McCreary said after the talk. Processors are not going to get any faster, but chip cores will continue to proliferate. So the issue of scaling out across multiple processors needs to be addressed, he said.

McCreary also agreed with Stonebraker's view that NoSQL users don't have a unified query language, which will slow the adoption of NoSQL as a whole. But McCreary suggested languages other than SQL could be used as a unified query tool for new databases, such as XQuery, a query language for XML documents.

Oracle did not immediately respond to a request for comment.

Joab Jackson covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Follow Joab on Twitter at @Joab_Jackson. Joab's e-mail address is Joab_Jackson@idg.com

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