Macro Scheduler's scripting more powerful than the name implies

Macro Scheduler is a powerful tool for macro creation and execution.

By Ian Harac, PC World |  Software, scripting

Some of the noteworthy features of Macro Scheduler include the ability to capture text from windows (which you can them programmatically parse), compare bitmaps for similarity, and produce fairly robust interactive dialog boxes.It has a somewhat more robust programming environment than some competing programs, such as AutoHotKey. AutoIt is comparable or superior in coding strength, but is not as focused on organizing/running macros.

There are a few downsides. Some things are not as intuitive as I would have expected, such as identifying controls within a window. Macro Scheduler 13 runs under 64-bit Windows, but many OS calls require you to set a flag in your program first. The documentation is adequate, but not outstanding; I would have preferred more contextual examples of function calls, especially those with several options and parameters. One last thing: While the range of functionality of Macro Scheduler has expanded greatly since its initial 1997 release, it looks very much as if the interface design has not. It's an irrational reaction, but if a programs look and feel is highly dated, it can be hard to accept that it's capable of handling modern system requirements. Under the hood, Macro Scheduler 13 has been constantly updated to deal with ever-increasing file and disk sizes, system speeds, and so on.

The thirty-day trial provides full functionality, easily enough to evaluate Macro Scheduler and see if it meets your needs.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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