Programmer personality types: 13 profiles in code

By Peter Wayner, InfoWorld |  Software

As you would expect, the Multitasker is more than happy to work on several projects at the same time. Indeed, the biggest problem is keeping the Multitasker from volunteering for more projects before completing their backlog. The Multitasker is confident they can repurpose some code they have somewhere on their machine and perhaps even write the same code for multiple projects simultaneously. Nothing to it, they say.

Car: Anything with heads-up display, hands-free cellphone, and OnStar running at once
Relationship status: Group-texting a booty call
Household chore: Folding laundry with a spatula while flipping pancakes with a smartphone between texts
Role model: Squad of ninjas
Pet: "Which of you cats ate another gerbil?"
Favorite programming construct: interrupt
Drink: Boilermaker

Programming personality type No. 8: The Duct Taper

They can take a Fortran dusty deck, translate that into Lisp, cross-compile that into Java, and translate that into JavaScript using the Google Web Toolkit to let you run that green-screen application in your browser. There's no need to rewrite it or even debug it because it will run just fine in IE8 or Firefox 5+. It was nothing, really.

When some people rewrite code, the Duct Taper knows how to wrap some glue code in a proxy and translate the output to whatever format you need. Why get rid of a perfectly nice set of APL routines when a PHP proxy can turn the data into JSON?

Car: Frankentruck
Relationship status: Gone fishin'
Household chore: Piling yet another perfectly serviceable appliance part in the backyard
Role model: Tim Taylor from "Tool Time"
Pet: "We had to get her a hip replacement after the ACL tear."
Favorite programming construct: Emulator
Drink: Sterno

Programming personality type No. 9: The True Believer

Did you know that the best way to run Ruby is with Java? The Java devotees will tell you this in case you're thinking. The C lovers know that it would run faster than a Ferrari if someone would rewrite it in C because that's the only way to "get close to the metal."

It usually seems moderately funny to set up a lunch with a Python lover and C devotee and watch them snipe at each other for an hour.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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