Adobe to Linux users: Get Chrome or forget Flash

Spells out plans for this year and next in new roadmap

By , Computerworld |  Open Source, Adobe, Adobe Flash

On Apple's OS X, Adobe said it was working on adding sandboxing to Adobe AIR applications -- AIR is a cross-platform runtime environment that lets developers craft applications using, among other things, Flash and HTML -- so that they can be distributed via the Mac App Store.

Apple had earlier set a March 1 sandboxing deadline for all software funneled through the Mac App Store, but today extended that to June 1.

Adobe also reported that it's working on Flash for Windows 8, but said little else than that.

"[Windows 8] includes a number of different user interface configurations (desktop and Metro) and targeted processor chipsets (x86/64 and ARM), which create a number of different development targets for the Flash runtimes," Adobe said, referring to both Flash itself and AIR.

Microsoft has already said that it will not support the Flash Player plug-in on Windows 8's "Metro" interface, or on the mostly-Metro Windows on ARM (WOA). The version of Internet Explorer (IE) that runs in WOA's desktop mode will also shun plug-ins like Flash, according to Steven Sinofsky, the Microsoft executive who leads the Windows division.

Adobe's decision will impact Mozilla's Firefox on Linux, likely locking that browser into Flash Player 11.2: Mozilla has said it was "not interested in or working on Pepper at this time."

Mozilla did not reply to questions on whether it's now reconsidering its position on Pepper, and failing that, what it would recommend Firefox users running Linux do.

Gregg Keizer covers Microsoft, security issues, Apple, Web browsers and general technology breaking news for Computerworld. Follow Gregg on Twitter at @gkeizer , on Google+ or subscribe to Gregg's RSS feed . His email address is gkeizer@computerworld.com .

See more by Gregg Keizer on Computerworld.com .

Read more about linux and unix in Computerworld's Linux and Unix Topic Center.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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