If desktop Linux is dead, someone had better tell all those users

It's hard to take seriously assertions of Linux's desktop 'death' when usage is growing around the globe.

By Katherine Noyes, PC World |  Software, Linux

It seems scarcely a year can go by in the world of computer technology without some eager young blogger or another grandly proclaiming the death of Linux on the desktop.

Here at PCWorld alone, we saw it in late 2010, and now here it is again, resurrected for one more tired round.

I can only speculate as to the authors' motives for making these weary proclamations, because they're nothing if not light on real information. What I can do, however, is point out a few small problems with their arguments.

First and foremost, what does it even mean to say desktop Linux is "dead" if it's being embraced and used by growing numbers of individuals and corporations around the world?

A Leap In Usage

OK, so here we go again--and this time it's easier than ever.

In fact, the timing of this latest anti-Linux song and dance was not chosen well for the point its author sought to make, given all the robust statistics that are coming out about Linux's growing usage.

Just two months ago, for instance, there was the report from none other than Net Applications revealing a significant jump in Linux usage on the desktop in the second half of last year.

Net Application's figures, moreover, are conservative, given even stronger statistics from W3Counter, Wikimedia, The H, and O'Reilly.

Those consumer figures are up by a lot compared with when I last had to point all this out, and among businesses it's a similar story. Indeed, multiple studies suggest that businesses and government organizations around the globe are increasingly relying on Linux and other open source software as well--not just on servers but on desktops too.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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