Review: 7 password managers for Windows, Mac OS X, iOS, and Android

1Password and KeePass lead the field in features, flexibility, browser integration, and ease-of-use

By Serdar Yegulalp, InfoWorld |  Security, password manager, password managment

The best part about KeePass, apart from it being free: It's available for just about every commonly used computing platform. I keep a copy on both my desktop and Android phone, and I find it at least as useful on my phone as on my PC.

Cost: Free open source. Platforms: Windows, Mac OS X, Linux, iOS, Android, J2ME, BlackBerry, PalmOS. 

KeePass is a free open source password vault with a great collection of add-ons. It stores most everything you would want to keep protected.

KeeperA few years ago, Keeper would've been great. Now it feels dated and clunky, with a few good ideas that don't justify the whole package.

Unlike 1Password, which keeps credit card info and other kinds of data, Keeper stores only username/password combos, which can be entered manually or imported from a file. Passwords can be stored in subfolders and searched for with a keyword. New passwords can be generated randomly, but you can't set the parameters for the password generator, a useful feature many other programs provide.

Browser integration with Keeper is stilted at best. On Android, you can copy and paste usernames and passwords into your website's log-in form, but it's clumsy. KeePass handles the same process much more elegantly. What's more, if you launch a URL from within a Keeper record (such as your bank's home page), it's opened only within Keeper's internal browser. You have to cut and paste to open the URL with any other browser. On Windows, there is no real integration with browsers. There also doesn't appear to be any provisions for a plug-in or add-on system, so the functionality you see is all you get.

One Keeper feature I didn't see elsewhere is the self-destruct function. If enabled, the program destroys the password vault if you enter the wrong master password five times in a row.

If you have Keeper on more than one device, you can buy a Keeper account and use that to synchronize your passwords across all your devices -- not bad, but not unique either. While Keeper costs only $10 per device per year, 1Password ($50 single-user flat fee) and KeePass (free) offer far more functionality.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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