Zuck treats Facebook investors the same as he treats users -- with disdain

But in this case the Facebook co-founder's instincts are sound

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Now prospective Facebook investors know how many users of the social networking service feel -- unappreciated and unimportant.

Facebook, of course, is planning to go public in a few weeks, which means Wall Street investors want to meet with the company's top executives to discuss its plans and prospects.

But Facebook co-founder Mark Zuckerberg was nowhere to be found last week when analysts and bankers were given the first of many briefings in preparation for an initial public offering that could come in May.

Zuckerberg is hardly the first Silicon Valley CEO to treat the Wall Street suits with disdain -- Apple co-founder Steve Jobs in particular had little time or sentiment for shareholders -- but his no-show is ruffling some pinstriped feathers.

From Reuters:

"We don't think that he should be hiding from the investors," said Carin Zelenko, the director of the capital strategies department for the International Brotherhood of Teamsters.

"He wants investors to put their money behind him, with the confidence in him personally, as the person who built this company and who's going to lead it and control it. He should be accountable to those people who are investing."

I wonder how Jobs would have responded to a suggestion that he "should be accountable" to investors. I suspect his response would have melted some faces.

Here's another irate prospective investor, courtesy of Reuters:

"Investors are crazy to want to get in bed with a company where the guy who controls it doesn't even pretend to care about the rest of the shareholders," said Greg Taxin of activist investment firm Spotlight Advisors, who will not buy shares. "That seems like a recipe for disaster."

Indeed! Look at what happened with Apple and its screw-the-shareholders CEO. It was like the Titanic! Well, at least if the Titanic ended up being the most valuable public company in the world.

Seriously, for all his vaunted brilliance and charisma, Zuckerberg strikes me from afar as a fairly arrogant young man. I think Facebook's cavalier approach to privacy bears this out.

But in this particular case, I don't blame him. I think a little distance from prospective investors is a good thing, especially when some of them clearly want Zuck to act as if he's their "employee."

I'm with Business Insider's Henry Blodget on this.

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