WampServer delivers a smart, Windows-friendly platform for Apache, MySQL and PHP-based apps

By Susan Perschke, Network World |  Software

The WampServer installation on both our 32- and 64-bit Windows servers was surprisingly straightforward with just a few prompts from the Windows executable file we downloaded from WampServer.com (there are separate files for 32 and 64-bit architectures).

First, to make it easier to clearly identify and work with the newly installed WampServer files, we selected an empty, newly-formatted NTFS extended partition and an empty 'wamp' folder as the destination for the install.

Next the WampServer installer prompted for a choice of a website browser. It defaulted to Internet Explorer, and we accepted the default, although we also later installed and tested WampServer with Google's Chrome browser.

That's all there was to the initial installation.

At the conclusion of the installation, WampServer started up without incident, as evidenced by a new icon in the Windows system tray that initially changes color from red to orange to green, with green indicating that the Apache web server is running and listening for incoming HTTP requests. (If the icon stays orange, or red, this indicates that there was a problem starting the Apache web service.)

WampServer installs an unobtrusive GUI services and utilities manager that can be easily accessed by single-clicking the tray icon.

WampServer listens on Port 80 by default. To confirm this, and to make sure there were no conflicts, we ran the utility 'Test Port 80' from the utility Apache | Service menu.

The results were displayed in a command prompt window.

WampServer - Port 80 Test Results

Once we confirmed that WampServer was running and listening on Port 80, we attempted to view the homepage at http://localhost. On our first attempt, we received a 403: Access Denied/Forbidden error. What we initially thought was a permissions error, turned out to be a minor DNS problem. By default WampServer listens on all interfaces on Port 80. Since our Windows 2008 server was not configured for the DNS role, we needed to give WampServer a little help to determine where the 'localhost' was pointed. We replaced 'LISTEN 80' with 'LISTEN 127.0.0.1:80' in the Apache httpf.conf file, which is the master configuration file used by Apache web server. After making this minor tweak to the httpd.conf file, we were able to view the WampServer 'localhost' home page in IE (for security reasons, remote web access is not enabled in the initial installation).


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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