Samsung Galaxy S III FAQ: everything you need to know

Samsung's splashy Galaxy S III Thursday launch was packed with information, but we'll tell you what you really need to know.

By Ginny Mies, PC World |  Software, Android, HTC

When Will the S III Come to the United States?

According to our sources at Samsung, the 4G (HSPA+/LTE) versions of the S III will come to North America this summer. Samsung said it will optimize the phones for the LTE and HSPA+ networks. Timing, pricing, or carrier partners have not yet been announced.

What is the Deal with the New Sharing Apps?

Samsung made a big deal about the ease of sharing from the S III, but from what I can tell, it looks like you can only share from your S III to another. Samsung has enhanced Android Beam, which allows large files to be transferred between phones quickly. Now called S Beam, you can share music, photos, and up to 1GB of video from your S III to your buddy's S III.

To help you understand, here's how Android Beam works on the Galaxy Nexus.

Samsung also enhanced its DLNA service for sharing content from your phone to your TV. AllShare Cast lets you wirelessly connect your Galaxy S III to your TV, tablet, or PC and share files over WiFi. However, you'll have to buy the separate All Cast Hub accessory in order to use this feature (see the Accessories question below)

What is an HD Super AMOLED display?

The 3.4-inch-thick S III has a 4.8-inch HD Super AMOLED display with a 1280-pixel by 720-pixel resolution. This is the same display technology we saw on the Galaxy Nexus. The Galaxy S II had Super AMOLED Plus, which is actually based on a PenTile pixel structure in which pixels share subpixels.

The Galaxy S II phones, on the other hand, have full RGB displays in which the pixels have their own subpixels. This means that HD Super AMOLED displays have lower overall subpixel density, which could translate to reduced sharpness and degraded color accuracy.

When we compared the Galaxy Nexus to the Galaxy S II, however, we didn't notice a huge difference in display quality. The only quality different we detected was color accuracy, especially with whites (they appeared to have a yellowish tint). I have yet to see the Galaxy SIII up close and personal, so I'm not sure if it suffers from this same issue

One cool thing is that despite the Galaxy S III having a larger display than its predecessor (4.8 inches versus 4.3/4.5 inches), it isn't much bigger. There's very little bezel around the phone as the display takes full advantage of the hardware real estate.

Will Battery Life Really Improve?

Battery life is the bane of every tech user. Samsung claims that it won't be an issue with the S III as it has a larger 2100mAh battery. For comparison, the Galaxy S II has a 1560mAh battery, while the Galaxy Nexus has a 1750mAh battery. The granddaddy of phones with long battery life, the Droid Razr Maxx, has a 3300mAH battery.

I fear that Samsung's all-seeing front-facing camera might put a strain on the battery life, however. Also, phone manufacturers still haven't worked out all the kinks with battery conservation on LTE networks. Battery life will depend on what sort of processor Samsung is packing into its S III phones for the United States and, as we've learned, this is still very much up in the air.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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