Why Ouya is making a killing on Kickstarter

The open-source Android-powered gaming console Ouya is the fastest-growing Kickstarter campaign in history. Here's why.

By Alex Wawro, PC World |  Software, Android, kickstarter

By the time you read this, more than 27,000 people will have pledged over $3.5 million to help finance the Ouya
campaign on Kickstarter. That beats the Ouya team's asking price of $950,000 all hollow, and the pledge total will
probably climb much, much higher before their crowdfunding campaign closes in the second week of August. Ouya
raised more than a million dollars on Kickstarter in less than eight hours, beating out both
Double Fine Adventure
and the Pebble watch to become the fastest-growing Kickstarter campaign in history. It's
a fantastic crowdfunding success story, but plenty of questions remain about why the Ouya campaign is attracting so
many donors.

Who would pay money for an open-source gaming console running on a modified version of Android 4.0? The next
generation of home gaming consoles will be available next year, and thus the lion's share of gaming enthusiasts
have little incentive to invest in a brand-new system from an unproven manufacturer. Gamers who don't already own a
home console probably play games on their PC or Apple device, and thus would have seemingly little reason to invest
in a new platform like the Ouya. So what makes the Ouya console so intriguing?

The Ouya console is cheap: anyone who donates $99 or more to the Ouya Kickstarter campaign will
receive an Ouya console with at least one controller. That's a better deal than anything offered by contemporary
console manufacturers, and it's cheaper than most mobile gaming devices (sans contract subsidies). Of course, you
get what you pay for; the components of the Ouya console are outmatched by current-gen consoles like the
PlayStation 3 and Xbox 360. While most dedicated gamers will balk at the Ouya's lack of a discrete graphics card,
the device isn't designed to take full advantage of your HDTV and killer sound system. It's designed to take
advantage of the Android platform's open nature and make it easier for more people to make and play games for less
money.

The Ouya console is moddable: let's face it, tech enthusiasts love to support anything that can be customized,
improved or "hacked" with minimal hassle. The folks behind Ouya know that, and they seem committed to promoting the
Ouya console as an "open" device that anyone with a standard screwdriver can open up and tinker with.


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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