Apple opens up lead on Android in enterprise mobile app dev

Developers are rapidly losing interest in Windows Phone 7, but see potential in Windows 8

By , InfoWorld |  Software, Android, Apple

Apple's iOS mobile platform has amassed a substantial lead over Google's Android when it comes to which platform developers prefer for building enterprise mobile applications, according to survey results released Tuesday.

The Appcelerator/IDC second quarter mobile report, which polled 3,600 developers using Appcelerator's Titanium mobile development tools, found that 70% of respondents stated they are building applications for an enterprise audience. Fifty-three percent of respondents believe Apple was best positioned for the enterprise, as opposed 37% who believe Android has the edge. This is a significant increase from the third quarter of last year, when the two platforms were even at 44%.

[ Also on InfoWorld: Find out what developers like about the Android 4.1 "Jelly Bean" OS. | Learn how to work smarter, not harder with InfoWorld's roundup of all the tips and trends programmers need to know in the Developers' Survival Guide. | Stay informed on both on mobile computing and application development by subscribing to InfoWorld's Mobilize and Developer World newsletters. ]

"iOS is basically very well positioned in the enterprise, according to our developers," said Michael King, Appcelerator director of enterprise strategy. Apple has outdone Android in security and management, with Apple offering a measure of control over applications getting onto devices, King said. Apple also has courted enterprise developers, with productivity applications and complex applications built on SAP making their way onto iOS devices, he added.

The study did see stabilization for Android, with 69% of respondents very interested in building for the platform. The number had been dropping steadily since peaking at 88% several quarters ago. Sixty-seven percent were very interested in Android in last quarter's report. Overall, 63% of developers find developing for multiple OSes to be the biggest annoyance they face, King said.


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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