A new app lets you send pictures via sound

A little birdy told me that a new app called Chirp could revolutionize how we all communicate

By , Computerworld |  Consumerization of IT, apps

For example, TV shows constantly tell viewers to follow them on Twitter or go to some web site. What they're doing is giving the audience a homework assignment, making them type a code in order to receive some information.

However, with Chirp, TV shows could just play the chirps. Viewers watching at home would passively receive all the content chirped by the show.

TV shows could allow photo "uploads" by phone, too. You can imagine TV shows providing a number that has an answering machine. Users could snap a picture, then leave the chirp of the picture as a message on the machine.

It works just as well on radio, on podcasts, in videos and any situation where sound is involved.

For example, the Chirp demonstration video casually throws in some chirps. And if you have the app running while you watch the video, the picture in the video is magically transferred to your phone.

You can hold a phone up to a microphone in a crowded auditorium -- or embed the sound file in your slides -- and everyone in the room can get a copy of your slides.

I tested the concept of using Chirp for mass communication on a live netcast this week called MacBreak Weekly.

I joined the show via Skype video all the way from Greece. To demonstrate Chirp, I held my iPhone up to the microphone, and let the app chirp a picture of my sister's dog. People in the California studio got it instantly. They then re-chirped it, and one of the hosts of the show, himself Skyping in from Massachusetts, got the picture, as did the studio audience and the people watching the live-streaming video online. In literally a few seconds, I transmitted a photograph across the world to thousands of strangers. The video recording can transmit it to tens of thousands more.

I recommend the whole show, but you can see the Chirp demo starting just after the 1:33 mark in the video.

By the way, If you listen to this video with Chirp running, you'll get a picture of my sister's dog, too.

The potential applications for Chirp are seemingly endless.

Movie studios could put chirps at the end of movie trailers to send viral marketing campaigns to the audience. After people leave the theater, they can use Chirp to share the same campaigns.

Nightclub DJs could mix chirps into their music, sending a constant stream of photos out to everyone in the room.

Kiosks could use chirps instead of Bluetooth or other short-range wireless technologies. The benefit would be much higher ease of use.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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