Perfect RSS reader for iPad

By Joel Mathis, Macworld |  Consumerization of IT, rss reader

Perfect RSS Readera Google Reader client for iPad from Connect Technologydoesnt quite live up to its name: Its not perfect. But it is quite good.

Its strongly reminiscent of Reeder for iPad. Like that popular app, Perfect RSS Reader gives you a nice overview of unread blog posts in a spine along the left side of your window; the specific blog post you want to read is featured in a larger space taking the right two-thirds of the screen.

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From there, though, differences become apparent. Swipe left, and the blog post fills your entire screen for distraction-free reading. Swipe right, and the spine reappears. And if Perfect RSS Readers default settings arent easy on your eyes, you can change both the fonts and the background colorsa dark mode background is included. You can also tap on the headline to see a post in its original web format. (A free version of the app also includes banner advertisements along the bottom of the screen.)

Perfect RSS Reader has several other nifty features: You can add new feeds within the app, for example. And you can choose to view a page that contains just thumbnail versions of the photos that appear in your feed.

But Perfect RSS Reader falls short in several ways. In Reeder, its easy enough to click over and see just the folders of your bundled RSS feeds, represented as cards on the screen. Seeing your folders can take a couple of steps in Perfect RSS Reader, and new users might stumble through the un

labled trial-and-error navigation for awhile before they figure out how to do so.

One other oddity: The app has a Notes feature that sounds usefulit would be useful to jot down thoughts on blog postsbut appears to be a relic from when Google let users share items more widely. When I tested the app, the feature didnt work.

Those are minor complaints. Perfect RSS Reader is mostly easy to use and certainly nice to look at. With a few tweaks, it might even deserve its name.

Joel Mathis is a writer in Philadelphia.

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Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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