Groovy: The roadmap for the popular JVM language

Project lead Guillaume Laforge explains what's in store for Groovy, and Grails lead Graeme Roche outlines that related framework's future

By , InfoWorld |  Software, Groovy, java

Groovy is a popular, open source, dynamic language residing on the Java Virtual Machine. Born in 2003, Groovy offers Java developers an almost-zero learning curve while gaining inspiration from Python, Ruby, and Smalltalk, according to its developers. Complementing it is the Grails open source Web application framework, which leverages Groovy.

InfoWorld Editor at Large Paul Krill recently spoke with Groovy project lead Guillaume Laforge and Grails project lead Graeme Rocher about what to expect in future versions.

[ Groovy is one of the top five JVM scripting languages. Learn about them all. | Subscribe to InfoWorld's Developer World and Enterprise Java newsletters. ]

InfoWorld: Why does Groovy exist?

Laforge: Initially, Groovy was created as a companion to Java, rather than as a replacement. The idea was to be able to simplify certain aspects of the Java language to make Java developers more productive.

InfoWorld: What are the main benefits of Groovy, and what differentiates Groovy from other languages, such as Ruby, Scala, Python, or Java itself?

Laforge: We wanted to complement Java by offering new features that were available from other languages, such as Ruby, Smalltalk, and Python. In terms of syntax and look and feel, it looks very much like Java. So it's very easy for Java developers to learn Groovy.

InfoWorld: What's the advantage of using Groovy instead of just using Java?


Originally published on InfoWorld |  Click here to read the original story.
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