Electronic Arts embraces BYOD, consumerization of IT and cloud

By Thor Olavsrud, CIO |  Consumerization of IT, BYOD, Electronic Arts

Clearly there is a place for the heavy-weight console business and market, but more and more of today's gamers, more and more of the demographics are changing away from consoles, away from the typical teenager, 16- to 24-year-old. They're moving more and more to casual gaming, more and more to interrupt-driven games, more and more to free-to-play models. That is all Internet-enabled and not enabled through a console business. So we had to think about reinventing our business, our business processes, how we do things. It's also causing us to take a look at how we do things internally.

CIO.com: What are the things that you are looking at internally that need to change?

Tonnesen: Today we have a very broad network of game products and a very broad network of game providers. We own a lot of intellectual property and capital. We also use a lot of game partners and partnerships. We collaborate quite a bit and quite directly with them. What it really requires is for us to collaborate not just among employees, but actually outside the EA enterprise. That has become more critical to our successbringing new game titles to the market more quickly and allowing us to do this in a secure way. As you know, if we lose any intellectual property before the release date, there goes our market; there goes our business. It's critical from a security standpoint and, quite frankly, it is all about time to market.

CIO.com: I understand that one of the big decisions you've made to enable that secure collaboration is to partner with Box. What does Box bring to the table?

Tonnesen: You have to continually innovate and innovate in a very rapid way, and Box allows us to do that. It allows us to share content, it allows us to collaborate and it allows us to bring together the game intellectual types with the company to market in a much more quick and seamless way. That's why we chose them and that's why I think in a broad sense we're looking at changing our business. It is not any longer just writing software and building games and publishing a bunch of CDs that are going to get shipped out. It's about collaborating more broadly across our company and outside.

If you look at the broader context, we could talk all day about where the consumerization of IT and bring-your-own-device to work kinds of strategies are. We know the cloud is coming or here and is moving very, very rapidly. I think those are all easy things to jump on the bandwagon, but more to the point we're trying to turn a company and reinvent it, and we're using Box in a big way to do that through all of its processes. Ideation and collaboration on new game intellectual titles is exactly the key area of focus.

CIO.com: Can you give us some perspective on some of the things that make Box central to what you're doing these days?


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Consumerization of ITWhite Papers & Webcasts

See more White Papers | Webcasts

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question