Top 10 CRM tricks guaranteed to lose customers

By David Taber, CIO |  Enterprise Software, CRM

As Frasier Crane said on his TV show, "If less is more, imagine how much better more would be." Publishing more documentation is easy to measure, so it's easier to nail the departmental bonus. Sure, it might be better to create a small number of documents that really matter and that are oriented to the perspective of the user's likely problems. But that's harder, more expensive and can require more subtlety of measurement. That's no good. So let's go back to the high-volume, low-quality approach that we know so well.

5: Use a Crummy Knowledge Base Search Engine

If you have a lot of documents, you're sure to want a search engine that exposes them all to the customer. Look at all the stuff we've found for you-it's mostly useless drivel, if not misleading and outdated, but just look at it all! Much better to do this than to have the search engine say, "Sorry, we can't find anything useful for you." That would be depressing for the pointy-haired boss.

4: Hide the Can Opener Inside the Can

You've got the greatest content and a really strong correlation engine to serve up just what that customer needs. Even though this is just help for a toaster oven, you're going to lock all that content behind a registration wall so Google can't see it. That way, users don't understand why they should go through a ridiculous registration process to find out how to clean the crumbs out of their toaster.

Analysis: Why Customer Experience Management Is the Next Step in Interaction

3: Don't Perform Usability Testing With an Outsider

Now you've set up a sophisticated application with an AI-driven knowledge base and a terrific customer self-service portal-all on schedule and on budget, and all because you skipped the part about testing with real, outside users. It's OK, though, since all the guys from the Indian call center ran through the test scripts, and they all said it came out fine. You've proven that your own people can navigate the system that they designed. What could be better?

2: Set Up a Ticket Echo Chamber

We all know how ticketing and case management systems are supposed to work, and we want the user to be able to check the status and make updates from email and the Web. While you're at it, throw in instant messaging and paper airplanes. Too bad you made it so that, whenever somebody responds in one medium, it creates a new ticket for the other media. Every time somebody makes an update anywhere, they are daisy-chaining the creation of yet another ticket in an endless loop. Boy, look how high our ticket-close rate is getting!


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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