Chrome Experiments: A foundation for future browser apps

By Mark Gibbs, Network World |  Software, chrome browser, Chrome Experiments

The battle for dominance between the major browsers continues on desktop, pad, and mobile platforms and, according to [Net Applications' Net Market Share, as of October all versions of Microsoft's Internet Explorer combined had just over 54% of the desktop market having gained about 2.2% since December, 2011. Firefox, over the same period, lost 1.84% (currently at just under 20%) while the other big contender, Google's Chrome, currently stands at just less than 19% having lost 0.56% in the same 10-month period.

Of course, analyses by other market watchers differ: For example, SitePoint puts the October figures at 40.18% for IE, 26.39% for Firefox, and 25.05% for Chrome.

While these results may vary what they all appear to indicate is that the way the market is roughly divided up is, at least for now, reasonably stable. SitePoint contends "We have reached a point of web stability. IE10, Chrome, Firefox, Safari and Opera are all capable browsers; there is little to choose between them."

Hmm, I'm not sure I agree with the idea that there is little difference between the browsers. Microsoft's dominance in the browser market is arguably due to its installed base via OS sales as well as the combination of consumer and enterprise familiarity having bred content and not, I would suggest, on much else.

In fact, when it comes to creativity and new ideas about what can be done with browsers that one that has my attention is Google's Chrome.

In fact, if you've not visited Chrome Experiments for while (or ever) you absolutely should do so; you'll find some amazing stuff there. Google explains:

"Chrome Experiments is a showcase for creative web experiments, the vast majority of which are built with the latest open technologies, including HTML5, Canvas, SVG, and WebGL. All of them were made and submitted by talented artists and programmers from around the world."


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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