7 most important tech trends of 2012

By John Brandon, CIO |  IT Management, 3D printing, biometrics

NFC first appeared in phones late last year, but the concept took several months to catch on. Now, you see it everywhere: Samsung shows two phones bumping together to exchange a playlist in its commercials. Many new models from Google and Samsung support the technology, which requires a slight contact to exchange a small amount of data. Moo.com recently started offering a business card with an NFC chip, and Samsung TecTile tabs make it easy to connect to a Wi-Fi network.

Feature: NFC Not Just for Mobile Payments: Six Future UsesNews: NFC Use Growing Outside Smartphones

The main advantage: Bluetooth is too hard to configure for many, and the immediate data exchange of NFC means people are more likely to use the technology on a whim.

4. Long-Range Biometrics

Biometric security, for example, uses a fingerprint or iris scan to grant security access. For the past 10 years, the idea has grown, but few of us use the technology on a daily basis. That could change with long-range scanners such as those made by IDair AIRprint, which captures fingerprints at 500 pixels per inch but does so from about three feet away. That means much more flexibility in how a building security checkpoint works-and much faster processing time. The AIRprint has another advantage: while the reader sits about three feet away, processing can occur anywhere over Wi-Fi.

5. Super High-Resolution Displays

The Samsung Series 9 monitor is an example of a brilliantly crisp, colorful, and super high-resolution monitor, which runs at 2560 x 1440 resolution, makes photos pop and Word documents look like they were a printed page sitting in front of you. This past year, Apple jumped on the bandwagon as well, with so-called Retina displays on the MacBook Pro laptop and the new iPad. With an increase in resolution, employees can keep a Skype video screen in one corner, a Web browser to the side and another business app on the same screen, all without any loss of fidelity or workspace cramping.

6. Bring Your Own Device (BYOD)


Originally published on CIO |  Click here to read the original story.
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