Microsoft alum: Windows 8 "a much deadlier assault weapon" than Windows 7

By , Network World |  Windows, windows 8

Windows 8 is just what Microsoft needs to take advantage of the ongoing irreversible shift from PCs to handheld devices including iPads, iPhones and other form factors yet to be designed, according to the company's former OEM chief.

Just as Windows 7 won instant popularity after the debacle of Vista, Windows 8 is poised to capture business from phone and tablet leaders such as Apple, only to greater effect, says Joachim Kempin, former Microsoft senior vice president in charge of OEMs who worked for the company from 1983 to 2002.

"Windows 7 spearheaded a comparably small rejuvenation," Kempin says in his just-released book "Resolve and Fortitude: Microsoft's Secret Power Broker Breaks his Silence". "I predict Windows 8 is readied as a much deadlier assault weapon."

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He says the main intent of Windows 8 is to push the operating system into low-powered mobile devices running ARM processors vs traditional x86 chips. He says that when Microsoft introduced Windows 8 nearly two years ago it "flabbergasted the IT world by running on a tablet powered by NVidia's ARM-based CPU. I consider this move to ARM a scale 9 earthquake and wake-up call for MS's longtime allies Intel and AMD."

He says that shift potentially signals the end of notebooks and PCs, not just media tablets. A strength of Windows 8 is its common interface and navigation across all devices, he says.

"No need to bother with the annoyance of having to remember different key strokes or gestures when switching between devices or operating them with a mouse or a touch screen," Kempin says. "Neither Apple nor Google have ever accomplished such uniformity."

He praises the design of Microsoft's two Surface tablet models but dooms them to failure.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
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