Fedora, openSUSE ditch MySQL, in a major database shake-up

By Jon Gold, Network World |  Software, databases, Fedora

Two major open-source projects, Fedora and openSUSE, are planning to ditch the venerable Oracle MySQL database framework and adopt MariaDB instead.

The Fedora project's wiki says that the decision to make the switch was prompted, at least in part, by uncertainty over Oracle's stewardship of MySQL.

[10 free Drupal modules that make development easier and 10 most successful open source projects of 2012]

[ CLEAR CHOICE TEST: Six free databases with commercial-quality features

MORE ORACLE: Oracle loses appeal of ruling in Hewlett-Packard suit ]

"Fedora will have a truly open-source MySQL implementation and won't depend on what Oracle decides to do with MySQL in the future," the document says.

According to the project, MariaDB is also "faster in some cases," and has other small advantages over Oracle's product.

The change shouldn't be overly complicated for administrators, since MariaDB - a fork of MySQL - is highly cross-compatible with the Oracle-managed version, Fedora says.

According to The H Online, the database change was one of several tweaks accepted by the project's developers, the Fedora Engineering Steering Committee. Others included integration of KDE KScreen technology for screen management and an update that will ensure network interfaces have predictable names for easier administration.

The changes will take place in Fedora 19, which will also be the last version to support MySQL.

Earlier this month, SUSE Linux engineer Michal Hrusecky announced that openSUSE would make MariaDB the default MySQL implementation in version 12.3 of the operating system.

"'I'm not saying that I'm unhappy with Oracle's MySQL, I know that there is plenty of people doing great job at Oracle pushing MySQL forward, but I believe that new default will bring some more goodies to our users without any unpleasant side-effects. And as we believe in choice, you can still choose Oracle's MySQL over MariaDB. It's up to you," he wrote.


Originally published on Network World |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness