Office 2013 pricing loophole discounts suite by as much as $40

'Product key code' prices up to 14% less than pay-to-download single licenses at retail

By , Computerworld |  Software, Microsoft Office, office 2013

As Microsoft pointed out Tuesday in a blog post, all Office 2013 versions have adopted the more restrictive rights that first showed up in Office 2010's PKCs. Office 2013 licenses are permanently tied to a specific PC, and cannot be reassigned to another machine unless that PC conks out during its warranty period.

Amazon.com's marketing materials, for instance, labeled the Office 2013 license as a "one-time purchase for the life of your PC; non-transferrable."

Office 2010 PKCs had the same limitations, Microsoft said in attempt to convince customers that it had not really changed the Office license with 2013. But the full-priced versions, called "Full Packaged Product," or FPP, by the company, could be reassigned.

FPP versions vanished with the debut of Office 2013.

The cheaper PKC copies of Office 2013 soften the sting of Microsoft's price increases for the suite: It bumped up prices of a single license as much as 17% when compared to 2010's PKC prices.

The $120 for a Home & Student PKC, however, is the same as the PKC for Office 2010 Home & Student, while the $190 for a PKC of Office 2013 Home & Business is $10 less than the same version of Office 2010 as a PKC. Office 2013 Professional's $360 for a PKC, meanwhile, is $10 more than the $350 for a PKC of Office 2010 Professional.

Office 2013 pricing

'Product key codes,' or PKCs, for Office 2013 cost up to 14% less than Microsoft's retail SKUs, but give customers the same suite in the end. (Source: Microsoft)


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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