PlayStation 4 vs. PC graphics: Can Sony even compete?

The Sony PlayStation 4 may be the most powerful console ever announced, but under the hood it's still just a midrange gaming PC.

By Brad Chacos, PC World |  Hardware, gaming, pc gaming

So what do the PlayStation 4's computer-esque specs portend for the games industry? By adopting the oh-so-familiar x86 CPU architecture used in PCs, Sony made it a lot easier for developers to build games that work on both computers and consoles with minimal fuss--especially if the Xbox 720 also utilizes a similar AMD APU with 8 Jaguar cores, as has been uttered in fairly credible rumors.

Even better, PC gamers should hopefully see the number of shoddy console ports drop precipitously once the next-gen consoles are here, because console developers will already pretty much be writing their games for PC hardware. The transition may also pay dividends for console gamers, since tapping into the familiar x86 architecture could mean console developers will be able to put the pedal to Moorhead's proverbial metal early in the PlayStation 4's lifecycle.

The PlayStation 4 is also a major win for AMD, and one that will be amplified if the next-gen Xbox indeed uses an AMD APU of its own. Not only does the PlayStation 4 ensure a steady revenue stream for years to come, but it also ensures that all games developed with an eye toward console conversion will be optimized to work on AMD's GPUs--a huge advantage for the (somewhat struggling) hardware giant. The appearance of APUs in mainstream consoles also advances AMD's "heterogeneous system architecture" initiative.

Finally, the PlayStation 4's APU-powered core only cements the fact that gaming is undergoing a convergence. Sorry, pitchfork-wielding fanboys, but the walls you've so vociferously defended on either side of the PC-versus-console debate are being torn down.

PC gaming is breaking away from the desktop, consoles are streaming games to smartphones and being controlled by Windows apps, the PlayStation 4 is nothing more than a computer in a console's clothing, and you can tweet from absolutely any gaming device you can get your grubby hands on. (If the ability to send 140-character messages from everywhere isn't the true meaning of convergence, I don't know what is.)


Originally published on PC World |  Click here to read the original story.
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