Oracle's Mark Hurd, users weigh in on third-party software maintenance

'Typically we don't like people messing with our intellectual property,' Hurd said

By , IDG News Service |  Software

Oracle's action against Rimini was "common knowledge" to Kimberly Griffiths, senior vice president of global technology programs at commercial real-estate services provider Jones Lang LaSalle. "I'm a big fan of not being bullied," and if anything drastic occurs as a result of the court case, her company could revert back to Oracle support, she said.

But Griffiths confessed to being "very nervous" before inking a contract with Rimini Street. "I wasn't against it, but I can't say I was in favor of it," she said. However, "for me I looked at what we were paying in native vendor support and the value wasn't there."

Griffiths rationalized that if she saved 50 percent off her JD Edwards support bill by going with Rimini Street and ended up with the same level of service, at least Jones Lang LaSalle would be saving money.

But Rimini's service "exceeded my expectations on so many levels," Griffiths said. "That's why I'm here today."

Bugs are getting fixed faster and Rimini stays on top of needed tax and regulatory updates for the software when countries change local laws, she said. Technicians have even been helpful with infrastructure-level issues that fall outside the core application, according to Griffiths.

However, Jones Lang LaSalle will probably end up back with Oracle at some point, when Oracle's software evolves enough to warrant an upgrade, she said.

Chris Kanaracus covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Chris' email address is Chris_Kanaracus@idg.com

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