Dell corrals acquired products for BYOD market

Dell's latest bid to expand beyond PCs is a push into mobile device management

By , IDG News Service |  Software

Dell has pulled together products it gained from recent acquisitions into a series of BYOD offerings, though it faces the challenge of selling them at a time when the company's ownership hangs in the balance.

The offerings are aimed at the hot "Bring Your Own Device" market, where vendors are pitching software and services to help manage the influx of personal smartphones and tablets that employees are bringing into corporate networks.

Dell has taken products from its acquisitions of Quest, SonicWall, Credant, Wyse and others and packaged them with hardware and services into offerings for different aspects of mobile management. It's a continuation of Michael Dell's strategy to make his company less reliant on PCs and expand in more profitable areas like software and services.

Despite the troubles Dell has faced, including missed earnings reports, some analysts are upbeat about its technology. Charles King at Pund-IT said Dell's mobile offerings are competitive, and Ray Wang of Constellation Research said the BYOD market is still fairly open, giving Dell an opportunity.

Despite that, Dell's transformation to a software- and services-driven company has been floundering. Part of the issue may be how Dell is perceived among customers, King said. "You can do everything in your power to reinvent yourself, but when the individual you're creating is somewhat contradictory to the person people know, it takes a while to get the market to recognize the changes you've made," he said.

Dell now faces the added challenge of winning new business at a time when it's involved in a public fight between Michael Dell, who wants to take his company private, and shareholders who think he is not offering them enough money for their stock.

The outcome shouldn't make a big difference to customers, according to Wang. Whether Dell ends up private or public, it will continue to invest in mobile device management. Still, some customers might hold off signing contracts until the outcome becomes clear, he said.

Dell will be competing with IBM, which recently launched its own mobile push, as well as SAP and dozens of specialty firms like MobileIron.

Dell positions itself as the champion of midsized businesses, who have smaller IT departments and need products that are easier to implement. That could help distinguish it from IBM, which does better with large enterprises, King said.

The "mobility solutions" announced Wednesday cover four areas: extending existing PC management tools to include mobile devices; providing mobile access to virtual desktops and cloud applications; securing network access; and updating applications to make them accessible from mobile devices.

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