Oracle to charge extra for 12c database's 'fundamental' feature

Intrigue builds over an Oracle and Microsoft press conference set for Monday

By , IDG News Service |  Software

For the better part of a year, Oracle has touted the "pluggable database" feature in its upcoming 12c database release as a significant architectural shift that will usher in major performance and efficiency improvements and also make cloud-based applications more secure.

But customers who want to take advantage of the pluggable database concept when 12c is released won't get it in return for their regular maintenance fees. Instead, Oracle plans to offer it as a "separately priced option," CEO Larry Ellison revealed Thursday on the company's fourth-quarter and year-end earnings call.

The feature allows multiple databases to run inside of a single 12c database instance and constitutes Oracle's take on multitenancy, which is a key ingredient of cloud-based applications.

In the past, multitenancy has referred to a practice followed by SaaS (software as a service) vendors such as Salesforce.com, where many customers share the same application instance, but with their data kept separate. Oracle believes that application-level multitenancy is inferior and less secure than 12c's approach, which pushes multitenancy to the database tier, Ellison said on the conference call.

Pluggable databases in fact represent "a fundamental re-architecture of the [Oracle] database," Oracle senior vice president Andy Mendelsohn said at last year's OpenWorld conference when 12c was introduced. "Now if I'm an administrator, I have one database overall to administer."

But in order to get that experience, customers who upgrade to 12c will need to fork over extra money above and beyond the core license fee for Oracle Database Enterprise Edition, which as of Friday remained listed at $47,500 per processor, as it has been for some time.

Mendelsohn's characterization of pluggable databases as a "fundamental" change to the platform notwithstanding, Ellison's announcement is not altogether surprising.

Many other previously released features for Enterprise Edition also carry additional fees, such as Real Application Clusters, which cost $23,000 per processor.

While Oracle tends to give customers heavy discounts off list price for software licenses, by breaking out pluggable databases and other options from the main product, it generates additional streams of lucrative annual maintenance revenue.

Therefore, Oracle database customers who have been anticipating 12c and paying for maintenance on the core product will likely be disappointed to discover that they won't receive pluggable databases as part of a regular upgrade.

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