Pinecones and snails and bears, oh my! Here are some wild ways to die

Outside Magazine details gruesome ways to meet your demise in the great outdoors

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It will not end well

Image credit: Flickr/Scott Calleja


Everyone has their own "favorite" worst ways to die. At the top of my list, for as long as I can remember, is being devoured by a carnivore.

I really can't think of a worse way to go. The feelings of terror and powerlessness -- something can just eat me alive!? -- must be overwhelming.

So I found Outside Magazine's recent list of "the 10 worst ways to die in the wild" to be fascinating because six of the items on the list feature living things killing -- if not eating -- human victims.

There are some glaring omissions, if you ask me: Seriously, no lions, sharks or hippos? But this is one of those cases where the publication tries to strive for balance, so I guess it's understandable. And it does include bears.

Below are the 10 worst ways to die in the wild, according to Outside. The online mag has some good (grisly) detail about how things would go down in each case, so it's worth a read, if ruminating over gruesome deaths is your bag.

Falling -- Being afraid of heights, I really would hate this one.

Cassowary -- Not happening unless you're in New Guinea or Australia, but these giant birds would rip you to shreds like the velociraptors in Jurassic Park.

Heat stroke -- Vomiting, seizures, sphincter release; need I say more?

Bear -- "Scalping you with its front teeth." Lovely.

Drowning -- Utter, helpless panic. If only a shark would swim by to put you out of your misery.

Octopus -- It's not the arms; it's the toxin of the blue-ringed octopus that will get you in about 15 minutes.

Sea snail -- Didn't see this one coming. Who knew snails had venom?

Bees -- You actually can survive a few hundred bee stings. Initially. But proteins in the bee venom may dissolve your insides within a week.

Pinecones -- Not just any pinecones can kill you, but the ones weighing more than 20 pounds that fall from a bunya pine will do the trick.

Beaver -- Those jaws that easily take down trees can do a number on your main arteries.

Now read this:

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