Oracle sues companies it says provide Solaris OS support in illegal manner

The lawsuit is the latest move by Oracle against third-party support providers

By , IDG News Service |  Software

Oracle's allegations are similar to ones it has made in lawsuits against other Solaris service providers, such as ServiceKey, as well as Rimini Street, which provides third-party support for Oracle and SAP applications.

Like Terix, other third-party providers have maintained they operate within the legal boundaries of customers' license rights.

Software vendors derive handsome profits from support and maintenance revenues, which also provide continuous income even when customers scale back on new license purchases, and are undoubtedly loath to see money siphoned away to third parties.

There are a few lessons for all customers to take away from the swirl of ongoing litigation, said analyst Ray Wang, CEO of Constellation Research.

"Customers who have paid maintenance should always be in the process of downloading all the patches, updates, and fixes they are entitled to before they cancel the contract," Wang said via email.

"It's an unfair trade practice to force customers away from third party maintenance options," he added. "This lock-in is monopolistic in general, regardless of the vendor. Customers should make sure they do not bundle any Oracle and Sun contracts to avoid any other issues that continue a lock-in behavior."

Chris Kanaracus covers enterprise software and general technology breaking news for The IDG News Service. Chris' email address is Chris_Kanaracus@idg.com

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