Haven't applied to die on Mars yet? You only have 5 days!

Mars One deadline looms for Earthlings eager to fly one way to Red Planet

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Image credit: Flickr/FlyingSinger


I blogged about the Mars One expedition only a couple of weeks ago, but I would be remiss if I didn't give From the Lab readers a heads-up about an important deadline.

If you truly want to be one of the four settlers slated to land on the Red Planet in 2023 -- and never return to Earth -- you have until August 31 to submit your application.

You'll be joining an increasingly crowded field of crazies candidates. Two weeks ago, Mars One reported that the number of applicants had exceeded 100,000. Now that number is closer to 165,000.

But don't necessarily worry about being out-geeked for a seat on the Mars One craft.

"It's easily assumed that Mars One is only looking for pilots and engineers," Mars One chief medical officer Norbert Kraft said in a statement. "Don't disqualify yourself too easily. If you wish to be a Mars pioneer despite of the risks and challenges that come with this job, you are already more qualified than most people on this planet. It is most important that you are healthy and have the right mindset."

See? You already are more qualified than most people on Earth, except for all the other candidates who are qualified because they applied.

You never know who Mars One will select. Maybe they'll use the formula followed by the lost city of Atlantis, as laid out by Donovan:

Knowing her fate,
Atlantis sent out ships to all corners of the Earth.
On board were the Twelve:

The poet, the physician, the farmer, the scientist,
The magician and the other so-called gods of our legends.

Just working with the five gods listed, if we had to winnow it down to four, I'd say the poet is vulnerable unless he or she can slam up a storm.

All kidding aside, anyone age 18 or older is perfectly welcome to apply to die on Mars. I just don't think it's a particularly good idea.

Now read this:

10 things that happen to our bodies during space flight

Spidernaut never got to enjoy its fame

Polar ice sheets continue to melt, but climate-change deniers remain thick as ever

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