Seven myths about iPhone Exchange policies

Misinformation about connecting iPhones to corporate networks could get your business into serious trouble.

By , InfoWorld |  Personal Tech, iPhone, Microsoft Exchange

I've been called everything from stupid to a Microsoft fanboy in recent days for an opinion article criticizing Apple's handling of a bug fix in the iPhone OS. While there's legitimate argument over how damaging Apple's decisions were, many e-mails, comments, and blog posts show how few users really understand the issues around access policies when connecting to corporate servers. And many bloggers are telling users that there's a simple fix to this issue. There isn't. For many enterprises that allowed or were planning to allow iPhone access to their networks, Apple's handling of this situation is, in some measure, a betrayal.

[ Read the article that set off the controversy over Apple's handling of the iPhone's Exchange policy support. | Learn how this is not the first time Apple had quietly fixed a policy bug in the iPhone. ]

First, a recap: A bug fix in the iPhone OS 3.1 update now ensures that iPhones and iPod Touches accurately report back to Microsoft Exchange servers whether they have on-device encryption enabled. Prior to Version 3.1, iPhone OSes reported to Exchange that the devices had on-device encryption despite the fact that no device prior to the iPhone 3G S included that functionality. Because of this, Exchange servers set to allow connections only from devices with encryption enabled -- a federal and state requirement for many organizations -- have been accepting connections from unencrypted iPhones for more than a year.

Somewhere along the line, Apple figured this out. And by not telling IT of this issue earlier, Apple has put many organizations at risk of noncompliance. To add insult to injury, Apple's quiet bug fix suddenly and unexpectedly caused encryption-requiring Exchange servers to block iPhone and iPod Touch users, except for those with iPhone 3G S and the late-2009-model iPod Touch devices. This has caused headaches for many IT support staffs and embarrassed those IT admins who had convinced their companies to allow Apple's technology into their sacrosanct networks.

iPhone users and IT admins dealing with this issue would be wise to avoid falling prey to the following myths circulating widely on the Web.

Myth 1: You just need to turn off the policy at Exchange Several blogs have recommended a quick fix to the access issue: Turn off Exchange's on-device encryption policy requirement, and all iPhones and iPod Touches will then be able to connect to your network. Incredibly, Apple makes the same recommendation on its support page.

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