Brocade to release unified IP, Fibre Channel network management software

The company combines its IP and Fibre Channel management products

By , Computerworld |  Storage, Brocade

Brocade today announced a new application aimed at managing storage-area networks (SAN) that use the Internet or Fibre Channel protocols through a single user interface.

Brocade Network Advisor will offer network administrators the ability to configure, monitor and report on all Brocade switch-enabled SANs, including those using Fibre Channel over Ethernet (FCoE), wireless networks and multiprotocol label switching (MPLS), according to Ajay Nilaver, Brocade's director of product management and marketing.

"Through policy-based management and also through this unification, we're hoping customers will have to spend less time training their administrators on how to manage their networks," Nilaver said. "The intent is also to reduce [operational expenses]."

Brocade Network Advisor is the marriage of two Brocade products: Data Center Fabric Manager for Fibre Channel SANs and IronView Network Manager (INM) for Ethernet-based storage networks. Brocade obtained INM through its acquisition of Foundry Networks in 2008.

"We're taking the best of those two products into a new next-generation architecture that's based on code bases that have been around for many years," Nilaver said.

Brocade's Network Advisor offers a detailed audit of change activities. The application also aims to reduce network downtime and increase security with network monitoring, traffic analysis, fault isolation, change management and policy-driven remedial actions.

Brocade user I.J. Rosenblum is director of IT for the BOK Center/Tulsa Convention Center in Tulsa, Okla. He said managing a multiprotocol network infrastructure is time-consuming and requires multiple sets of tools in order to get the overall view of the network.

"IT managers can benefit from a single unified management platform that helps to automate processes and manage the entire network from SAN to wired and wireless LAN on a single user interface," he said. "It's a huge benefit that can minimize operational overhead and improve network reliability."


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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