Cloud storage a steep climb

By Beth Schultz, Computerworld |  Storage, Amazon S3, cloud storage

Today WhippleHill backs up critical data using a public cloud backup service from Zetta. The company had been backing up those files to disk and storing them in a different building on the corporate campus, Smart says. "We decided that really wasn't offsite enough for data like our source code, documentation and Wikis. We needed to get those out of here, and Zetta made it easy," he adds. He points out that Zetta helped WhippleHill write automated backup scripts and that it offers Windows sync capabilities and support for a wide variety of file system protocols -- including Secure Shell FileSystem, which WhippleHill uses for Linux server backups.

Still, Smart says he's not ready to entrust highly sensitive data, such as human resources information or credit card numbers, to cloud storage. And he wouldn't change his mind on that before thoroughly investigating Zetta's policies and procedures for ensuring that its customers can meet mandates such as the those of the PCI Security Standards Council. "Frankly, I haven't talked to Zetta about encryption on its end, because it hasn't been important for what we've got out there now," says Smart, noting that the data is encrypted across the wire and protected by passwords.

Local government alleviates risk

Brian Moynihan, IT director for Clinton, Mich., a small town 20 miles northeast of Detroit, faced similar data storage decisions.

"Of course, we do the industry-standard backups, with multiple copies on RAID drives and online storage in vaults. But ultimately we realized the township in and of itself is a centralized location. No matter how many copies of data I have in buildings around the township, in the face of a natural disaster, we still have a single point of failure in terms of our stored data," he says.

A year and a half ago, Clinton's steering committee began exhaustive discussions about how best to address that problem. It eventually decided to turn to public cloud storage, but at that time the most readily available options were consumer-oriented offerings from Carbonite and Mozy, Moynihan says.

"We began investigating what it would take for us to do honest-to-goodness cloud-based offsite storage but didn't initially find anything that provided a real good fit for what we wanted to do, which was to have an archived, easily accessible offsite copy of our data," he says.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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