Flash storage moves closer to CPUs

STEC is joining the ranks of vendors selling solid-state storage for caching within servers

By , IDG News Service |  Storage, flash storage, solid state drives

The Kronos and Kronos Turbo cards, with capacities ranging from 240GB to 980GB, can be used for primary storage within a server. But they are designed primarily to cache copies of frequently accessed data very close to the CPU for faster performance. This eliminates the delays caused by switches, RAID controllers and other components in a traditional storage system, said Scott Stetzer, STEC's vice president of technical marketing. STEC claims its new technology can cut latency from hundreds of milliseconds to 30 nanoseconds if a company is migrating from a traditional SAN (storage-area network) or iSCSI (Internet SCSI) arrangement.

SSDs cost more per gigabyte than HDDs (hard disk drives). But because SSDs offer faster data retrieval, they reduce the need for expensive, fast-spinning hard disk drives and for techniques to maximize the speed of those drives, which can involve buying many disks and not using most of their capacity. Putting the SSD in a server can boost performance even more by eliminating multiple hops across a network for the most-used bits of data.

Within the Kronos modules, STEC has taken another step to boost server performance. The cards offload I/O tasks that with some similar PCIe products would have to be performed by the CPU, the company said. This frees up chip cycles that are needed for other work, especially in busy virtualized servers, Stetzer said.

This offloading feature sets STEC apart from Fusion-io, the incumbent vendor in this market, giving STEC at least one key differentiator to help it seize market share, ESG's Peters said. However, it will remain hard for STEC and other challengers to gain ground on Fusion-io, given existing supplier arrangements with system vendors, he said. Breaking into the PCIe business is a major goal for STEC, which last month lowered its financial forecast for the current quarter because of growing competition in its core business. STEC's stock has fallen by more than 50 percent since February.

The Kronos cards can read and write sequential data at 1.1GB per second and the Kronos Turbo at 2.2GB per second, according to STEC. They are now shipping to server makers in sample quantities. A Kronos Bi-Turbo line, with capacities as high as 1.95TB and a read/write rate of 3.6GB per second, is due early next year, Stetzer said. All the cards will be available in both SLC (single-level-cell) and MLC (multilevel cell) versions and will use STEC features for high reliability, he said. They will come with a five-year warranty.

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