OCZ talks up 2TB, 4TB SSDs, previews Thunderbolt-enabled drive

OCZ expects to release its Thunderbolt interface drive this summer

By , Computerworld |  Storage, OCZ, solid state drives

The Z-Drive R5 will be compatible with VMware ESXi and ESX, Linux , Windows Server 2008 and OS X servers.

By comparison, OCZ in February announced the fourth generation in its Z-Drive PCIe flash card line that is aimed at user in servers in cloud computing environments. The Z-Drive R4 CloudServ PCI Express SSD was demonstrated at the CeBIT show with VXL Storage Accelerator software from iSCSI SAN company SANRAD. The SANRAD software works with VMware and Citrix Xen server environments to create virtual storage area networks (SANs) for application virtualization and virtual desktop infrastructure (VDI).

The Z-Drive R4 delivers up to to 1.4 million IOPS, and comes in capacities ranging from 300GB to16TB.

OCZ's Vertex 4

Like Vertex 3 , the Vertex 4 is a 2.5-in. drive that uses multilevel cell (MLC) NAND flash chips built on 20 nanometer lithography technology. Unlike the Vertex 3, which had a maximum capacity of 480GB, the Vertex 4 uses OCZ's Indilinx controller and is expected to boast 2TB of capacity.

Besides having four times the capacity, Vertex 4 is expected to also have better performance than its predecessor due to the controller changeover. OCZ said using 4K data blocks, the drive will have 90,000 random read IOPS. The Vertex 3 sported a maximum of 40,000 IOPS. The drive also has a slightly better sequential read rate of 550MBps compared to 530MBps in the Vertex 3, while the write rates remain the same.

"This solution is ahead of schedule and originally we planned for a mid-summer release, but it is now looking like we will release it this spring," the spokesman wrote.

A 4TB SSD

OCZ also expects to release a 3.5-in. form factor SSD with a stunning 4TB of capacity.

With that kind of capacity, a 4U (7-in. high) rack-mount server chassis could have as much as 96TB of flash storage capacity.

Like the other SSDs, the upcoming 3.5-in. Chiron Series SSD will use an Indilinx controller, and will have up to 560MBps of throughput and generate up to 100,000 IOPS.

The Indilinx Everest 2 controller is expected to deliver exceptional speed and IOPS but also incorporates some features that set it apart from current controllers. Among these features is performance across all file types, including uncompressible data and special fast boot algorithms. The drive is also expected to sport "NDurance technology," which increases the lifespan of the NAND and minimizes long-term performance degradation, and latency reduction for quicker access across all applications.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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