PCIe SSD task force to tackle interoperability issues

SNIA group hopes to avoid a 'Tower of Babel' of nomenclature

By , Computerworld |  Storage, solid state drives, SSD

  Sign me up for ITworld's FREE daily newsletter!
Email: 
 

Fifty industry representatives have signed on to a task force created to address interoperability issues related to a plethora of form factors and connectivity issues for PCIe solid-state drives (SSDs).

The Solid State Storage Initiative (SSSI) PCIe SSD Task Force , which is being organized under the Storage Networking Industry Association (SNIA), will deal with current standards, any standards gaps that need to be filled and end-user concerns over interoperability between products.

Solid-state storage devices come in so many shapes and sizes that the electrical signal standards and OS drivers can vary from manufacturer to manufacturer.

Unlike SAS and SATA interconnects, which only increase in speed with each new generation of product, PCIe is a good fit for SSDs, as it allows the interface speed to be increased quickly by adding PCIe lanes, according to Paul Wassenberg, chair of SNIA's SSSI.

But not every SSD or systems manufacturer is speaking the same language when it comes to PCIe, Wassenberg said.

For example, standard SAS and SATA drives plug into a south gate on an Intel motherboard. If you plug that gate into a PCIe bus, it doesn't automatically show up as a mass storage drive on the computer system. A software driver is required for the operating system to recognize the PCIe SSD as a mass storage device, according to Eden Kim, chair of SNIA's Solid State Storage Initiative's technical group.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question