Whiptail whips up modularly scalable all-flash storage array

The Invicta all-SSD array can generate up to 650,000 IOPS

By , Computerworld |  Storage, flash storage, solid state drives

The Invicta, which uses multi-level cell (MLC) flash, comes in 2U (3.5-in.-high) storage module chassis. Each chassis holds up to 12TB of capacity and up to six chassis can be cobbled together for the maximum system capacity along with a single 2U router unit. A full rack consumes 1400 watts, which represents a reduction in energy use of up to 90%, compared to legacy hard-disk-drive arrays, according to Crain.

"This is the largest single-capacity SSD array made," Crain said.

One of the Invicta's strong points is its ability to serve up data in a multi-tenancy architecture, meaning that multiple business units, or businesses in the case of a cloud storage provider, can all share the same storage pool, Crain said. Additionally, the Invicta is backward-compatible, meaning Whiptail's previous generation, single-chassis SSD arrays, can be used in an Invicta configuration. That previous-generation unit had 24 SSDs for up to 12TB of capacity and 230,000 IOPS of performance.

The company also launched a new version of that single-unit array that it said is 5% to 8% faster.

The flash array market remains a relatively small one compared with the multibillion-dollar hard-disk-array market, Baltazar said, adding that flash will not lead to the extinction of disks.

"The high storage density and low cost of disk should keep hard drives around for a long time, and hard drives will continue to be the best medium for storing infrequently accessed data and large files such as video," he said.

Lucas Mearian covers storage, disaster recovery and business continuity, financial services infrastructure and healthcare IT for Computerworld. Follow Lucas on Twitter at @lucasmearian or subscribe to Lucas's RSS feed. His email address is lmearian@computerworld.com.

See more by Lucas Mearian on Computerworld.com.

Read more about storage in Computerworld's Storage Topic Center.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question