Seagate Backup Plus review: Save your social media data

Seagate's new line of lightweight external hard drives lets you back up both local and online data.

By , Computerworld |  Storage, hard drives, Seagate

The Backup Plus portable drive's Dashboard helps you save or share social media content.

Using Protect

The default (and simplest) setting of the Protect data backup tools is "Protect Now." It finds the drive, creates a backup of all non-system data, such as photos and documents, and then continuously backs up any new data saved to your computer. You can also save content from your Facebook and/or Flickr accounts into a folder called MyOnlineDocuments.

Another cool feature allows you to pause or delete the backup in progress. You choose the time or day of the week you want to back up. Otherwise, backups will be continuous.

You can also choose to back up all data files or just files in your personal documents folder, your music, photos or videos. You can select specific files by selecting "select files" and clicking on file names, and can choose to back them up either on the drive and/or on Seagate Cloud Storage. You can then choose to back them up monthly, weekly, daily, hourly or continuously.

Once I did get it set up, the tools and menu appeared well thought out and simple to use. For example, my Facebook photos and videos were saved in a folder marked "Facebook," which I found easy to locate and useful in ensuring my social networking documents remain intact. (Often, once I upload a photo to Facebook, I end up deleting it off my phone or camera to open up space on the memory card.)

I like the fact that the Protect tool also includes a Snapshot option, which gives you greater manual control over backups. A snapshot is an exact copy of all system data at a particular point in time, which avoids the slowdown of a full backup, which pauses applications as it records new writes. Snapshotting is a relatively advanced feature that only business class systems typically have -- it's great for making a quick copy of everything up to that point in time. By compiling snapshots over time, you can maintain a full backup because you're adding the new data to the old for a complete picture.

To retrieve files you've backed up, you just click on the "restore files" button, which brings you to a screen where you can select files or folders you want to restore. The default is to restore them to their original locations, but you can also send them to different folders.

Make time for the first backup

As I expected, using a USB 2.0 cable, the initial backup took quite a while: roughly 3 hours and 45 minutes to back up 77.69GB of data. As a result, it's best to perform your first backup overnight, as it will likely slow down other application's performance.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question
randomness