Disaster recovery plans get new urgency

Changing weather patterns pose new threats to corporate data centers and cloud computing host sites.

By , Computerworld |  Storage, cloud computing, data centers

Experts also noted that despite past warnings, many major corporations still insist on maintaining IT operations in a single building within a corporate campus or on using third-party cloud computing services hosted only in nearby facilities.

Berman said he doesn't understand why so many companies, including several major banks, have long insisted on maintaining all IT operations at headquarters, clinging to the belief that data is safest when it's nearby. Executives at these companies have ignored warnings that a single regional disaster -- something that is becoming ever more likely -- can take out an entire IT infrastructure.

"If they were just smart enough to move their servers from one [region] to another, they'd avoid these issues," he said.

"I advise my clients that you can't depend on any one thing," said Dan Olds, an analyst at Gabriel Consulting Group. "You can't depend on the cloud unless you have something to fall back on."

This version of this story was originally published in Computerworld's print edition. It was adapted from an article that appeared earlier on Computerworld.com.

Read more about storage in Computerworld's Storage Topic Center.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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