Violin to bring deduplication, replication, other tools to all-flash storage arrays

The software update later this year should help bring the products up to feature par with disk arrays

By , IDG News Service |  Storage, flash storage

With a significant price premium over disk-based systems, all-flash arrays started out as tools for speed-intensive niche applications such as financial trading, he said. However, partly driven by higher-volume flash manufacturing for consumer devices, the price of solid-state storage is declining.

"As some of the costs have come down, it's finding more broad use cases," Janukowicz said.

IT departments that are looking at flash arrays as an alternative to disk-based systems will tend to demand the kinds of data management features and high availability they are used to, he said. The features Violin is adding should help it meet that bar.

Privately held Violin, based in Mountain View, California, was founded in 2005 and shipped its first product in 2009. Its 6000 array is sold by Hewlett-Packard under the name VMA (Violin Memory Array). Violin claims just over 300 customers, focused on large enterprises.

Stephen Lawson covers mobile, storage and networking technologies for The IDG News Service. Follow Stephen on Twitter at @sdlawsonmedia. Stephen's e-mail address is stephen_lawson@idg.com

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