Apple announces hybrid drive technology in Macs

With 128GB of NAND flash, this hybrid solution is far ahead of the competition

By , Computerworld |  Storage, Apple, hybrid drives

Along with the long-awaited iPad Mini announcement today, Apple revealed what it called its Fusion Drive, which combines the high performance of NAND flash with the storage capacity of a hard disk drive (HDD).

The Fusion Drive will be included in the new iMac and Mac Mini desktops. Apple's OS and pre-installed applications will run on the SSD by default, while documents and media will run off the HDD.

The new Fusion Drive combines a massive 128GB of multi-level cell (MLC) NAND flash capacity with either a 1TB or 3TB HDD, but they appear as a single storage volume. With 128GB of NAND flash, this hybrid solution puts Apple ahead of the competition.

Apple claims the Fusion Drive offers performance similar to a pure solid state drive (SSD), but with the mass storage capacity and lower cost of an HDD.

Apple did not respond to a request for additional information about the Fusion Drive at deadline.

Apple is likely using flash technology from its purchase of Anobit, such as this Anobit Genesis 2 T-Series SSD.

Based on the amount of flash capacity offered by Apple, industry analysts do not believe the Fusion Drive is a hybrid drive, which combines flash and spinning disk in a hard drive form factor. Seagate sells the most popular version of a hybrid drive on the market - the Momentus XT, which has 8 GB of single-level cell (SLC) NAND flash along with up to 750 GB of spinning disk capacity.

Western Digital has also announced a thin hybrid drive for ultrabooks with up to 500GB of capacity.

The Fusion Drive's 128GB of flash capacity would require a great deal of space inside an HDD form factor, said Fang Zhang, an analyst with research firm IHS iSuppli.

"I think you can call it a hybrid solution," Zhang said. "Basically you have two drives: one SSD and one HDD but with a controller and software that can manage where the data goes."

"Anobit is their source for SSD, and the HDD is still from Seagate," Zhang continued. "The controller could come from Marvell."

Apple was already the industry's largest NAND flash consumer when, in December 2011, it acquired Israeli-based SSD maker Anobit.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Answers - Powered by ITworld

ITworld Answers helps you solve problems and share expertise. Ask a question or take a crack at answering the new questions below.

Join us:
Facebook

Twitter

Pinterest

Tumblr

LinkedIn

Google+

Ask a Question