Thunderbolt storage drives to strike later in 2013

By James Galbraith, Macworld |  Storage, Intel, Thunderbolt

CalDigit announced its new T3 RAID, a three-drive external enclosure that attaches to your Mac via Thunderbolt. It features two Thunderbolt ports for daisy-chaining other Thunderbolt peripherals and removable drive trays, which make it easy to swap drives out in case of failure or when you want to upgrade. You can configure the T3 RAID as RAID 0 for speed, use two of the drives in a mirrored RAID 1 array, or use all three as independent drives. The T3 RAID will be available in both SSD and HDD configurations. Due in July, prices for the hard drive versions will be $699 for 6TB and $1199 for a 12TB model; CalDigit has not finalized prices for the SSD configuration.

Thunderbolt Station

CalDigit also showed off its new Thunderbolt Station which offers owners of Thunderbolt-equipped Macs and PCs similar connection options as Apple's Thunderbolt Display. Simply connect one Thunderbolt cable from the dock to your Mac and you now have access to three USB 3.0 ports, another Thunderbolt port, gigabit ethernet, HDMI, and separate audio in and out ports. The Thunderbolt station should also be available in July of this year for $199.

G-Drive PRO with Thunderbolt

G-Technology used the show to introduce the G-Drive Pro with Thunderbolt. This desktop hard drive has dual Thunderbolt ports for daisy-chaining devices. G-Technology claims speeds comparable to SSD, but with the high capacities of standard hard drives. Two configurations of the G-Drive Pro with Thunderbolt, a 2TB and 4TB version, will be available this Summer at $700 and $850, respectively.

G-DOCK ev

Also new from G-Technology, is the G-Dock ev with Thunderbolt, the first of the company's new Evolution line of storage products. The G-Dock ev comes with two removable 1TB hard drive modules that fit into the dock and can be configured as RAID 0, RAID 1, or JBOD. When not inserted into the G-Dock ev, the modules can be used with USB 3.0, making it easy to shuttle drives back and forth. Fill them with data quickly with Thunderbolt, and then connect them to just about any computer using USB.


Originally published on Macworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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