SSDs do die, as Linus Torvalds just discovered

But SSD failure rates are still vastly better than hard disk drives

By , Computerworld |  Storage, linus torvalds, Solid-state drives

As NAND process shrinks in size -- that is, as the transistors become smaller and smaller to accommodate greater density and capacity -- firmware must compensate for the increase in errors. (The smaller cells or transistors get, the more likely data errors will occur.) NAND flash process technology has shrunk from 35 nanometers (nm) a few years ago, to under 19nm today.

"From the data I've seen, client SSD annual failure rates under warranty tend to be around 1.5%, while HDDs are near 5%," Chien said.

So the bottom line is that SSDs will fail -- even if you're Linus Torvalds -- but they are still more reliable and much faster than hard disk drives.

Lucas Mearian covers storage, disaster recovery and business continuity, financial services infrastructure and health care IT for Computerworld. Follow Lucas on Twitter at @lucasmearian or subscribe to Lucas's RSS feed. His e-mail address is lmearian@computerworld.com.

See more by Lucas Mearian on Computerworld.com.

Read more about ssd in Computerworld's SSD Topic Center.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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