Newegg takes pre-orders for Samsung's first 3D Pro SSD

The 850 Pro SSD is designed for workstations and high-end PCs

By , Computerworld |  Storage, Solid-state drives, SSD

Newegg on Thursday began taking orders for Samsung's most advanced solid state drive (SSD), a model that uses stacked, or three dimensional, NAND flash for greater performance and endurance over previous models based on conventional NAND flash.

Samsung's new 850 Pro SSD is designed for workstations and high-end PCs.

Built on Samsung's V-NAND, 3D NAND flash technology, the SSD is capable of handling up to a 40GB daily workload, which equates to 150TB written to it over 10 years. Because of that lifespan, 850 Pro SSD comes with a 10-year limited warranty, which is unprecedented with Samsung SSDs.

The 256GB version of the SSD 850 Pro is available from Newegg now for $199, and the remaining models will be available for sale by the end of July. Samsung's prices for the other versions of the 850 Pro are 128GB ($130), 512GB ($430) and 1TB ($730) storage capacities.

Samsung claims the 3D V-NAND flash chip technology offers better performance and efficiency, reducing power consumption by 20%.

Computerworld reviewed the Samsung SSD Pro 850 earlier this month and found it offered better read and write performance compared with similar models made by Seagate and OCZ.

This article, Newegg takes pre-orders for Samsung's first 3D Pro SSD, was originally published at Computerworld.com.

Lucas Mearian covers consumer data storage, consumerization of IT, mobile device management, renewable energy, telematics/car tech and entertainment tech for Computerworld. Follow Lucas on Twitter at @lucasmearian or subscribe to Lucas's RSS feed. His e-mail address is lmearian@computerworld.com.


Originally published on Computerworld |  Click here to read the original story.
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