To Build a Better Bobsled

Learn how supercomputers helped construct a faster bobsled for the 2010 U.S. Olympic Team.

By Todd R. Weiss, PCWorld |  Tech & society, bobsled, Olympics

19 Teraflops of IBM Computing Power

On the bobsled tracks, carving hundredths of a second from a team's runs can make the difference between a gold medal and also-ran status. For help in generating simulated images that allow sled engineers to achieve such gains, the designers turn to a supercomputer, which they use on an as-needed, on-demand basis via IBM's high-performance cloud network. The network consists of a cluster of 384 IBM System x3550 and x3450 blade servers, each with 8GB of RAM--all amounting to more than 19 teraflops of computing power at its peak. Each image like the one shown here takes about 8 hours for the software to generate. (Image: Exa Corporation)

See Also:
Winter Games: Videogame your way through the Olympics
The technology behind the Vancouver Olympic Games
Six high-tech ways to enjoy the 2010 Olympics

Republished with permission from PC World (view original version)

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